Edited Volumes

Edited Volumes

 

Braithwaite, D. O. & Thompson, T. (Eds.). (2000.) Handbook of communication and people with disabilities. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

  • Thompson, T. L. Introduction: A history of communication and disability research: The way we were (pp. 1-14).
  • Braithwaite, D. O., & Harter, L. M. Communication and the management of dialectical tensions in the personal relationships of people with disabilities (pp. 17-36).
  • Nemeth, S. A. Society, sexuality, and disabled/ablebodied romantic relationships. (pp. 37-48).
  • Do, T-P., & Geist, P. Embodiment and dis-embodiment: Identity trans-formation of persons with physical disabilities (pp. 49-66).
  • Soule, K. P., & Roloff, M. E. Help between persons with and without disabilities from a resource theory perspective (pp. 67-84).
  • Westhaver, S. M. Opening up Spaces for difference via a feminist phenomenological approach to disability (pp. 85-102).
  • Malanian, I., & Nevin, A. Effective communication to enhance special education (pp. 103-124)
  • Colvert, AA. L., & Smith, J. W. What is reasonable: Workplace communication and people who are disabled (pp. 141-158).
  • Herold, K. P. Communication strategies in employment interviews for applicants with disabilities (pp. 159-176).
  • Kreps, Gary L. Disability and culture: Effects on multicultural relations in modern organizations (pp. 177-192).
  • Fox, S. A., Giles, H., Orbe, M. P., & Bourhis, R. Y. Interability communication: theoretical perspectives (pp. 193-222).
  • Merrigan, G. Negotiating personal identities among people with and without identified disabilities: the role of identity management (pp. 223-238).
  • Iwakuma, M., & Nussbaum, J. F. Intercultural views of people with disabilities in Asia and Africa (pp. 239-256).
  • Shultz, K. Deaf activities in the rhetorical transformation of the construct of disability (257-272).
  • Haller, B. If they limp, they lead?: News representations and the hierarchy of disability images (pp. 273-288).
  • Wolfson, K., & Norden, M. F. Film images of people with disabilities (pp. 289-306).
  • Farnall, O. Invisible no more: Advertising and people with disabilities. (pp. 307-318).
  • Fox, S. A. The uses and abuses of computer-mediated communication for people with disabilities (pp. 319-338).
  • Parrott, R., Stuart, T., & Cairns, A. B. Reducing uncertainty through communication during adjustment to disability: Living with spinal cord injury (pp. 339-352).
  • McIntosh, A. When the deaf and the hearing interact: Communication features, relationships, and disability issues. (pp. 353-368).
  • Rose, H. M., & Smith, A. R. Sighting sound/sounding sight: The “violence of deaf-hearing communication” (pp. 369-388)
  • Smith, J. W., & Kandath, K. P. Communication and the blind or visually impaired (pp. 389-404).
  • Matthews, C. K., & Harrington, N. G. Invisible disability (pp. 405-422).
  • Whaley, B. B., & Golden, M. A. Communication with persons who stutter: Perceptions and strategies (pp. 423-438).
  • Romski, M. A., & Sevcik, R. A. Children and adults who experience difficulty with speech. (pp. 439-450).
  • Weitzel, A. Overcoming loss of voice (pp. 451-466).
  • Cline, R. J., & McKenzie, N. J. Interpersonal roulette and HIV/AIDS as disability: Stigma and social support in tension (pp. 467-484).
  • Knuf, J. The margins of communication: Coping with adult dementia (p. 485-506).
  • Braithwaite, D. O., & Thompson, T. L. Communication and disability research: A productive past and a bright future. (pp. 507-515).

 

Harter, L., Japp, P. M., & Beck, C. S. (Eds.). (2005). Narratives, health, and healing: Communication theory, research, and practice. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

  • Overview of Narrative and Health Communication Theorizing: Introduction by Phyllis M. Japp, Lynn M. Harter, and Christina S. Beck (pp. 1-6)
  • Harter, L. M., Japp, P.M., & Beck, C. S. Vital problematics of narrative theorizing about health and healing (pp. 7-30).
  • Babrow, A. S., Kline, K. N., & Rawlins, W. K. Narrating problems and problematizing narratives: Linking problematic integration and narrative theory in telling stories about our health (pp. 31-52).
  • Japp, P. M. Personal Narratives and Public Dialogues: Introduction (pp. 53-60).
  • Beck, C. S. Becoming the story: Narratives as collaborative, social enactments of individual, relational, and public identities (pp. 61-82).
  • Harter, L. M., Kirby, E. L., Edwards, A., & McClanahan, A. Time, technology, and meritocracy: The disciplining of women’s bodies in narrative constructions of age-related infertility (pp. 83-106).
  • Japp, P., M., & Japp, D. K. Desperately seeking legitimacy: Narratives of a biomedically invisible disease (pp. 107-130).
  • Workman, T. Death as the representative anecdote in the construction of the collegiate “binge-drinking” problem (pp. 131-148).
  • Carabas, T., & Harter, L. M. State-induced illness and forbidden stories: The role of storytelling in healing individual and social traumas in Romania (pp. 149-168).
  • Singhal, A., Chitnis, K. & Sengupta, A. Cross-border mass-mediated health narratives: Narrative transparency, “safe sex,” and Indian viewers (pp. 169-188).
  • Harter, L. M. Narrating and organizing health care events and resources: Introduction (pp. 189-196).
  • Rawlins, W. K. Our family’s physician (pp. 197-216).
  • Morgan-Witte, J. Narrative knowledge development among caregivers: Stories from the nurses’ station (pp. 217-236).
  • Sunwolf, L. R. F., & Keränen, L. Rx story-prescription: The healing effects of storytelling and storylistening in the practice of medicine (pp. 237-257).
  • Ragan, S. L., Mindt, T., & Wittenberg-Lyles, E. Narrative medicine and education in palliative care (pp. 259-276).
  • Buzzanell, P. M. & Ellingson, L. L. Contesting narratives of workplace maternity (pp. 277-294).
  • Miller, M. Z., Martin, P. G., & Beatty, K. C. Wholeness in a breaking world: Narratives as sustenance for peace (pp. 295-310).\
  • Beck, C. S. Narrative sense-making about self and other: Introduction (pp. 311-324).
  • Sharf, B. F. How I fired my surgeon and embraced an alternate narrative (pp. 325-342).
  • Beach, W. A., & Madelbaum, J. “My mom had a stroke”: Understanding how patients raise and providers respond to psychosocial concerns (pp. 343-364).
  • Keeley, M. P., & Koenig, J. K. Constructing life and death through final conversation narratives (pp. 365-390).
  • Bosticco, C., & Thompson, T. L. An examination of the role of narratives and storytelling in bereavement (pp. 391-412).
  • O’Hair, D., Scannel, D., * Thompson, S. Agency Through Narrative: Patients Managing Cancer Care   in a Challenging Environment (pp. 413-432)
  • Beck, C. S., Harter, L., M., & Japp, P. M. Afterword: Continuing the conversation: Reflections on our emergent scholarly narratives (pp. 433-444).

 

Heifferon, B., & Brown, S. C. (Eds.). (2008). Rhetoric of healthcare: Essays toward a new disciplinary inquiry. Cresswell, NJ: Hampton Press.

  • Barton, E. & Marback, R. The rhetoric of hope in the genre of prognosis (pp. 15-32).
  • Segal, J. Z. “Female sexual dysfunction” and a rhetoric of values (pp. 33-50).
  • Heifferon, B. Pandemics and/or pandemonium (pp. 51-74).
  • Martins, D. S. Diabetes management, the complexities of embodiment and rhetorical analysis (pp. 75-90).
  • Mebust, M. R., & Katz, S. B. Rhetorical assumptions, rhetorical risk: Communication models in genetic counseling (pp. 91-114).
  • Bernick, P., Bernhardt, S. A., & Cuppan, G.. (2008). The genre of the clinical study report in drug development (pp. 115-132).
  • Popham, S. L. As if good writing mattered: A rhetoric of pragmatism in health care business letters (pp. 133-48).
  • Reynolds, J. F. The rhetoric of mental health care (pp. 149-159).
  • Emmons, K. “All on the list”: Uptake in talk about depression (pp. 159-182).
  • Dinolfo, J. Seeing and re-viewing the human body: Reflections on the rhetoric of medical videography (pp. 181-202).
  • Zerbe, M. J. From the frontiers of IMRAD: Non-traditional medical research in two cancer journals (pp. 203-220).
  • Detweiler, J. To design a doctor(ate): Negotiating professional identities in a new clinical-doctoral program (pp. 223-244).
  • Ariail, J., & Smith, T. G. Concept analysis: Using an academic nursing genre for writing instruction in nursing (pp. 243-264).

 

Heritage, J., and Maynard, D. (Eds.). (2006). Communication in medical care: Interaction between primary care physicians and patients. New York: Cambridge University Press.

  • Heritage, J., & Maynard, D. W. Introduction: Analyzing interaction between doctors and patients in primary care (pp. 1-21).
  • Soliciting patients’ presenting concerns / Jeffrey D. Robinson – (pp. 22-47).
  • Heritage, J., & Robinson, J. D. Accounting for the visit: Giving reasons for seeking medical care (pp. 48-
  • Halkowski, T. Realizing the illness: Patients’ narratives of symptom discovery (pp.
  • Gill, V. T., & Maynard, D. W. Explaining illness: Patients’ proposals and physicians’ responses (pp.
  • Boyd, E., & Heritage, J. Taking the history: Questioning during comprehensive history-taking (pp. 151-
  • Heath, C. Body work: the collaborative production of the clinical object (pp.
  • Peräkylä, A. Communicating and responding to diagnosis (pp.
  • Maynard, D. W., & Frankel, R. M. On diagnostic rationality: Bad news, good news, and the symptom residue (pp.
  • Stiyers, T. Treatment decisions: Negotiations between doctors and patients in acute care encounters (pp.
  • Greatbatch, D. Prescriptions and prescribing: Co-ordinating talk- and text-based activities (
  • Sorjonen, M-L., Raevaara, L., Haakana, M., Tammi, T. & Peräkylä ,A. Lifestyle discussions in medical interviews (pp.
  • West, C. Coordinating closings in primary care visits: producing continuity of care (pp.
  • Drew, P. Misalignments in ‘after-hours’ calls to a British GP’s practice: A study in telephone medicine (pp.

 

Iedema, R. (Ed.). (2007). The discourse of hospital communication: Tracing complexities in contemporary health care organizations. New York: Palgrave/MacMillan. WEIRDLY, I HAVE 2 DIFFERENT CONTENTS LISTS FOR THIS, WHICH DON’T MATCH

From Worldcat:

  • Iedema, R. Introduction: Hospital communication, clinical interaction and health reform (pp.
  • Barton, E. The contexts of end-of-life discussions (pp.
  • Forsyth, R. Exploring the implications for laboratory scientists of test order computerization (pp.
  • Hobbs, P. The communicative functions of the hospital medical chart (pp.
  • Long, D. Gaping wounds: Coordinating multidisciplinary care in a spinal pressure sore clinic (pp.
  • Maseide, P. Transformation of x-rays into practical tools in collaborative medicine (pp.
  • Candlin, S., & Candlin, C. Contemporary care and the changing face of nursing (pp.
  • Kerosuo, H. Organizational interfaces in care provision of patients with many illnesses (pp.
  • Botin, L. Video analysis as a phenomenological tool investigating clinical interaction (pp.
  • Brown, B. & Crawford, P. “Quis custodiet ipsos custodies?”: Documentation, dialogue and reflexivity in the care of clients with borderline personality disorder (pp.
  • Iedema, R. Communicating about medical errors: “Critical incident reporting” and “root cause analysis” as emerging organizational-managerial interventions aiming to reform the clinical work (pp.
  • Iedema, R., Long, D., & Forsyth, R. Conclusion. (pp.

 

 

Kreps, G.L., & O’Hair, D., (Eds.). (1995). Communication and health outcomes. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

  • Kreps, G.L., O’Hair, D. & Clowers Hart, M. Communication and health (pp. 5-18).
  • Tsao, J. C., Gordon, T., Maranto, C., Leran, C., & Murasko, D. The effects of music and biological imagery on immune response (pp.
  • McNeilis, K. S., and Thompson, T. L. The impact of relational control on patient compliance in dentist/patient interactions (pp.
  • Beck, C. S., & Ragan, S. L. The impact of relational activities on the accomplishment of practitioner and patient goals in the gynecologic examination
  • Street, R. L., Piziak, V. K., Carpentier, W. S., Herzog, J., Hejl, J., Skinner, G., & McLellan, L. Metabolic control and communication in nurse-diabetic patient consultations (pp.
  • Yelsma, P. Husband and wife intimacy: attributes of physiological recovery of myocardial infarction patients (pp.
  • Juanillo, N. K., & Scherer, C. W. Informational support patterns and health lifestyles (pp.
  • Mokros, H. B., & Poznanski, E. O. Parental awareness of suicidal tendencies: child-parent communication and the mental health needs of children (pp.
  • Austin, E. W. Direct and indirect influences of parent-child communication on adolescents’ prevention behaviors for AIDS and drug abuse (pp.
  • Flora, J. A., & Schooler, C. Influence of health communication environments on children’s diet and exercise knowledge, attitudes, and behavior (pp.

 

Lay, M. M., Gurak, L. Gravon,, C., & Mynti, C. (Eds.). (2000). Body talk: Rhetoric, technology, reproduction. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press

  • Lay, M., Gurak, L., Gravon, C., & Myntti, C. Introduction (pp. 3-26).
  • Herrle-Fanning, J. Figuring the reproductive woman: The construction of professional identity in eighteenth-century British midwifery texts (pp. 29-
  • Dixon, K. M. Minding the uterus: C.T. Javert and psychosomatic abortion (pp. 49-66).
  • Verbrugge, M. H. Gym periods and monthly periods: Concepts of menstruation in American physical education, 1900-1940 (pp. 67-97).
  • Diepenbrock , C. God willed it! Gynecology at the checkout stand: Reproductive technology in the women’s service magazine, 1977-1996 (pp. 98-124).
  • Condit, C. M. Women’s reproductive choices and the genetic model of medicine (pp. 125-141).
  • Shanner, L. Bodies, minds and failures: Images of women in infertility clinics (pp. 142-160).
  • Turney, L. The politics of language in surgical contraception (pp. 161
  • Georges, E., & Mitchell, L. M. Baby talk: The rhetorical production of maternal and fetal selves (pp. 184-206).
  • Britt, E. C. Medical insurance as bio-power: Law and the normalization of (in)fertility (pp. 207-225).
  • Lay, M. M. The legal status of direct-entry midwives in the United States: balancing tradition with modern medicine (pp. 226-243).
  • Sauer, B. Hot tomalley: Women’s bodies and environmental politics in the state of Maine (pp. 244-261).
  • Thompson, M. The construction of public health in FDA hearings on silicone breast implants (pp. 262-

 

*Leach, J., & Dysart-Gale, D. (Eds.). (2011). Rhetorical questions of health and medicine. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

  • Leach, J., & Dysart-Gale, D. Why ask rhetorical questions? Asking rhetorical questions of health and medicine (pp. 1-8).
  • Segal, J. Z. What, in addition to drugs, do pharmaceutical ads sell? The rhetoric of pleasure in direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription pharmaceuticals (pp. 9-32).
  • Cwiartka, M. How do mice mean? The rhetoric of measurement in the medical laboratory (pp. 35-58).
  • Berkenkotter, C. Is the genre extant? The curious case of psychiatry’s case history (pp. 59-84).
  • Keränen, L. How does a pathogen become a terrorist? The collective transformation of risk into bio(in)security (pp. 85-120).
  • Spoel, P. How do midwives talk with women? The rhetorical genre of informed choice in midwifery (pp. 97-128).
  • Derkatch, C. Does biomedicine control for rhetoric? Configuring practitioner-patient interaction (pp. 129-153).
  • Dysart-Gale, D. How do children learn about illness and death? Managing suffering and sickness (pp. 115-180).
  • Leach, J. How do you talk to a patient? A question of decorum (pp. 181-193).

 

*Meloncon, L. (Ed.). (2013). Rhetorical accessability: At the intersection of technical communication and disability studies. New York: Baywood.

  • Elmore, K. Embracing interdependence: Technology developers, autistic users, and technical communicators (pp. 15-38).
  • Jarrett, C., Redish J., & Summers, K. Designing for people who do not read easily (pp. 39-66).
  • Meloncon, L. Toward a theory of technological embodiment (pp. 67-82).
  • Moeller, M. Pushing boundaries of normalcy: Employing critical disability studies in analyzing medical charity websites (pp. 83-89).
  • Gutsell, M., & Hulgin, K. Supercrips don’t fly: Technical communication to support ordinary lives of people with disabilities (pp. 83-94).
  • Arduser, L. (2013). The care and feeding of the d-beast: Metaphors of the lived experience of diabetes.95
  • Pass, E. Accessibility and the web design student (pp. 115-134).
  • Oswal, S. K., & Hewett, B. L. Accessibility challenges for visually impaired students and their online writing instructors (pp. 135-156).
  • Lewthwaite, S., & Swan, H. Disability, web standards, and the majority world (pp. 157-174).
  • Larkin, A. Web accessibility statements: Connecting professional writing, corporate social responsibility, and Burkean rhetoric (pp. 175-202).
  • Pappas, L., Accessibility as context: The legal, fiscal, and social imperative to deliver inclusive e-content (pp. 203-218).
  • Maloney, A. Resources (pp. 219-228).

 

Ratzan, S. (Ed.) (1993). AIDS: Effective health communication for the 90s. Washington, D.C.: Taylor and Francis.

  • Maibach, E. W., Kreps, G. L., & Bonaguro, E. W. Developing strategic communication campaigns for HIV/AIDS prevention (pp. 15-35).
  • Ratzan, S. C. Health communication as negotiation: The COAST model and AIDS (pp. 37-51).
  • Zook, E. G., & Miller, K. I. The role of care partners in managing AIDS patients’ illness: Toward a triadic model of health care delivery (
  • Franzini, L. R. The paradox of accurate information increasing the fear of AIDS (
  • Fabj, V., & Sobnosky, M. J. Responses from the street: ACT UP and community organizing against AIDS ( 91-
  • Brenders, D. A., & Garrett, L. Perceived control in the age of AIDS: A review of prevention information in academic, popular, and medical accounts (
  • Biddle, N., Conte, L., & Diamond, E. AIDS in the media: Entertainment or infotainment (pp. 141-150).
  • Payne, J. G. & Mercuri, K. A. Crisis in communication: Coverage of Magic Johnson’s AIDS disclosure (
  • Marlier, J. Freedom of the press to cover HIV/AIDS: A clear and present danger? (pp. 175-88).
  • Bartlett, C. L. Communication disorders in adults with AIDS (
  • Levy, M. L. Van Der Meulen, J. P. & Apuzzo, M. L. J. Neurosurgical professionalism and care in the treatment of patients with symptomatic AIDS (pp 203-.
  • Hein, K. K., Blair, J. F., Ratzan, S. C., & Dyson, D. E. Adolescents and HIV: Two decades of denial (pp. 215-232).
  • Ratzan, S. C., & Payne, J. G. Thinking globally, acting locally: AIDS action 2000 plan (

 

 

Thompson, T. L., Dorsey, L. A., Miller, K. I., & Parrott, R. (Eds.) (2011). Handbook of health communication (2nd ed.). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

  • Parrott, R., & Kreuter, M. W. Multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary approaches to health communication: where do we draw the lines? (pp. 3-17).
  • Babrow, A. S., & Mattson, M. Building health communication theories in the 21st century (pp. 18-35).
  • Sharf, B. M., Harter, L. M., Yamasaki, J., & Haidet, P. Narrative turns epic: continuing developments in health narrative scholarship (pp. 36-51).
  • Roter, D. L., & Hall, J. A. How medical interaction shapes and reflects the physician-patient relationship (pp. 55-68)
  • Clayton, M. F., & Ellington, L. Beyond primary care providers: a discussion of health communication roles and challenges for health care professionals and others (pp.
  • Whitten, P., Cook, D., & Cornacchione, J. Telemedicine: reviewing the past, looking toward the future (pp.
  • Real, K., & Poole, M. S. Health care teams: communication and effectiveness
  • Geist-Martin, P., & Scarduzio, J. A. Working well: reconsidering health communication at work (pp.
  • Aldoory, L., & Austin, L. Relationship building and situational publics: theoretical approaches guiding today’s health public relations (pp.
  • Turner, M. M., Skubisz, C., & Rimal, R. N. Theory and practice in risk communication: a review of the literature and visions for the future (pp.
  • Galarce, E. M., Ramanadhan, S., & Viswanath, K. Health information seeking (pp.
  • Sundar, S., et al. Online health information: conceptual challenges and theoretical opportunities (pp. )
  • Silk, K. J., Atkin, C. K., & Salmon, C. T. Developing effective media campaigns for health promotion (pp.
  • Roberto, A. J., Murray-Johnson, L., & Witte, K. International health communication campaigns in developing countries (pp.
  • Edger, T., Volkman, J. E., & Logan, A. M. B. Social marketing: its meaning, use, and application for health communication (pp.
  • Kline, K. N. Popular media and health: images and effects (pp.
  • DeLorme, D. E., et al. Advertising in health communication: promoting pharmaceuticals and dietary supplements to U.S. consumers (pp.
  • Thompson, T. L., & Whaley, B. Explaining illness (pp.
  • Cameron, K. A., Wolf, M. W., & Baker, D. W. Integrating health literacy in health communication (pp.
  • Dutta, M. J. & Basu, A. Culture, communication, and health: a guiding framework (pp.
  • Goldsmith, D. J., & Albrecht, T. L. Social support, social networks, and health (pp.
  • Wright, K. B., et al. Computer-mediated social support: promises and pitfalls for individuals coping with health concerns (pp.
  • Pecchioni, L. L., & Keeley, M. P. Insights about health from family communication theories (pp.
  • Cline, R. J. W. Everyday interpersonal communication and health (pp.
  • Politi, M., & Street, R. L. Jr. Patient-centered communication during collaborative decision making (pp.
  • Duggan, A. P., & Thompson, T. L. Provider-patient interaction and related outcomes (pp.
  • Ray, E. B., & Apker, J. Stress, burnout, and supportive communication: a review of research in health organizations (pp.
  • Goldsmith, J., et al. Life span and end-of-life health communication (pp.
  • Smith, R. A. Stigma, communication, and health (pp.
  • Ndiaye, K., et al. Communication and health disparities (pp.
  • Harris, L. M., et al. Health communication and health information technology: priority issues, policy implications, and research opportunities for healthy people 2020 (pp.
  • Robinson, J. D. Conversation analysis and health communication (pp.
  • Valente, T. W. Social networks and health communication (pp.
  • Du Pre, A., & Crandall, S. J. Qualitative methods: bridging the gap between research and daily practice (pp.
  • Dearing, J. W., Gaglio, B., & Rabin, B. A. Community organizing research approaches (pp.
  • Stephenson, M. T., Southwell, B. G., & Yzer, M. Advancing health communication research: issues and controversies in research design and data analysis (pp.
  • Morgan, S. E., King, A. J>, & Ivic, R. K. Using new technologies to enhance health communication research methodology (pp.
  • Kreps, G.L. Translating health communication research into practice: The influence of health communication scholarship on health policy, practice, and outcomes. ( 595-608).
  • Egbert, N., et al. (Re)viewing health communication and related Interdisciplinary curricula: towards a transdisciplinary perspective (pp.
  • Guttman, N. Ethics in communication for health promotion in clinical settings and campaigns: new challenges and enduring dilemmas (pp.

 

Zoller, H. M., & Dutta, M. (Eds.). (2008). Emerging perspectives in health communication: Meaning, culture, and power. London: Routledge.

  • Dutta, M. & Zoller, H. Theoretical foundations: Interpretive, critical, and cultural (pp. 1-38).
  • Bosticco, C., and Thompson, T. L. Let me tell you a story: Narratives and narration in health communication research (pp. 39-62).
  • Cripe, E. T. Supporting breastfeeding(?): Nursing mothers’ resistance to and accommodation of medical and social discourses (pp. 63-84).
  • Geist-Martin, P., Sharf, B., & Jeha, N. Communicating healing holistically (pp. 85-112).
  • Lupton, D. “You feel so responsible”: Australian mothers’ concepts and experiences related to promoting the health and development of their young children (pp. 113-128).
  • Melkote, S. R., Krishnatray, P., & Krishnatray, S. Destigmatizing leprosy: Implications for communication theory and practice (pp. 129-154).
  • Auger, S. J., DeCoster, M. E., & Colindres, M. D. Teach-with-stories method for prenatal education: Using photonovels and a participatory with Latinos (pp. 155-181).
  • McDermott, V. M., Oetzel, J. G., & White, K. Ethical paradoxes in community-based participatory research (p. 182-202).
  • Villagran, M., Collins, D., & Garcia, S. Voces de las colonias: Dialectical tensions about control and cultural identification in Latinas’ communication about cancer (pp. 203-223).
  • Camacho, A. O., Yep, G. A., Gomez, P. Y., & Velez, E. (2009). El Poder y la Fuerza de la Pasión: Toward a model of HIV/AIDS education and service delivery from the “bottom-up” (pp. 224-246).
  • Dutta, M. J., & Basnyat, I. Interrogating the radio communication project in Nepal: The participatory framing of colonization (pp. 247-274).
  • Murphy, A. G., Eisenberg, E. M., Wears, R., & Perry, S. J. Contested streams of action: Power and deference in emergency medicine. (pp. 275-292).
  • Ellingson, L. L. Changing realities and entrenched norms in dialysis: A case study of power, knowledge, and communication in health care delivery (pp. 293-312).
  • Harter, L. M., Deardorff, K., Kenniston, P., Carmack, H. J., & Rattine-Flaherty, E. Changing lanes and changing lives: The shifting scenes and continuity of care of a mobile health clinic (pp. 313-334).
  • Stokes, A. Q. The paradox of pharmaceutical empowerment: Healthology and online health public relations (pp. 335-364).
  • Conrad, C., & Jodlowski, D. Dealing drugs on the border: Power and policy in pharmaceutical reimportation debates (pp. 365-389).
  • Zoller, H. M. (2008). Technologies of neoliberal governmentality: The discursive influence of global economic policies on public health. (pp. 390-410).  New York: Routledge.
  • DeSouza, R., Basu, A., Kim, I., Basnyat, I., & Dutta, M. The paradox of “fair trade”: The influence of neoliberal trade agreements on food security and health (pp. 411-430).
  • Wood, R., Hall, D. M., & Hasian Jr, M. Globalization, social justice movements, and the human genome diversity debates (pp. 431-448).
  • Zoller, H. & Dutta, M. Emerging agendas in health communication and the challenge of multiple perspectives (pp. 449-463)